Following 2015 Metro Accident: Little Progress on Safety Recommendations

  A recent article in the Washington Post summarizes the lack of urgency by WMATA to address and remedy safety concerns that continue with Metro operations and endanger passengers. After the January, 2015 Metro smoke incident, which killed one passenger and left many others permanently injured, federal investigators identified serious safety violations. During its May, 2020 meeting, Washington Metro Safety Commission provided specific recommendations to address safety concerns. The commission noted a lack of urgency to adopt its recommendations, in spite of warnings that the December, 2015 tragedy could be repeated. For many of the problems cited in the 2015 investigation,…

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Are Pedestrian Accidents on the Rise in the DC Area?

Pedestrians here in the DC area are keeping an eye over their shoulder as they are walking along the streets of our communities. Local crashes are leaving a string of victims injured and, in some cases, leaving families to mourn. Drivers take the safety of those around them into their hands when they get behind the wheel, and we clearly need our drivers to be more conscientious. However, even simple day-to-day awareness on the part of the pedestrian can sometimes be enough for them to foresee and avoid a potential disaster. Are Pedestrian Accidents Getting Out of Hand in the…

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Summer 2019 Metro Closures Highlight Traffic Dangers

This summer, Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA), is shutting down six Metro stations on the blue and yellow lines south of Ronald Reagan National Airport. These stations include Braddock Road, King Street-Old Town, Eisenhower Avenue, Huntington, Van Dorn Street, and Franconia-Springfield. The Washington Post estimates that 17,000 daily commuters are affected by these station closures. Increased Traffic Volume The displacement of passengers affected by the station closures will likely increase traffic in the District and surrounding areas over the summer, especially during rush hour. Commuters not affected by the station closures should still be aware that they might face denser…

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Metro Removes and Subsequently Reinstates 3000-Series Cars

On Tuesday, the Washington Metro Area Transit Authority (“Metro”) took all of its 3000-series cars out of service after receiving a report that a car door had slid open on an Orange Line train on Sunday. According to The Washington Post, Metro first became aware of the incident after a rider posted a video of the open door on social media on Monday, and later confirmed the malfunction with camera footage at the Dunn Loring station. Metro’s General Manager, Paul Wiedefeld, said in a news conference on Tuesday that the removal of the 3000-series cars was temporary, and that Metro was unsure…

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