Public Concern Over Thousands of Unsafe Products Sold By Amazon Through Third Party Vendors

People usually assume shady internet transactions involve anonymous Craigslist ads or the dark web, not the world’s largest internet retailer. However, a recent study by The Wall Street Journal found that Amazon had over 4,000 unsafe items listed for sale on their website at a given time. The deficiencies varied by product, but items had in common federal agency warnings or prohibitions regarding their safety. Infractions varied from missing or misleading warning labels, to outright dangerous and banned products. The largest category of items were those that posed a choking hazard to children. Other products were found to have high…

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Athletes Should Be Cautious of What’s In Their Workout Supplements

Workout supplements are touted to give athletes an edge in their training and exercise, allowing them to bulk up faster or have more energy when exercising. The popularity and use of workout supplements has grown in the past decade. For many they are vital to keeping in top shape. However, exercise supplements are not required to be tested or approved by the FDA and could not only impede your exercise routine, but could pose serious risks to your health. Supplements: Good or Bad? Unsafe and illegal supplements, such as anabolic steroids, can cause severe health problems including elevated blood pressure,…

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American Academy of Pediatrics Continues to Support Baby Walker Ban

In the 1990’s, an average of 20,000 children were injured each year by child walkers. This high rate of injury led to a decline in popularity to baby walkers, and for the industry to adopt a voluntary safety standard in 1997. this voluntary standard was strengthened to a mandatory standard several years later in 2010. This change in regulation and popularity of baby walkers has led to a sharp decrease of injuries, but 2,000 children a year are still injured by baby walkers. This is why the AAP is voicing its continued support for an outright ban on child walkers,…

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Nootropics: How Safe Are They, Exactly?

In a competitive workforce and academic sphere, employees and students are more desperate than ever to gain an edge on the competition. Several believe that nootropics — drugs specifically designed to enhance cognitive function — represent that edge. Proponents claim that nootropics are highly beneficial and 100 percent safe, but a growing body of research suggests otherwise. Read on to learn more about these drugs — and why experts are sounding the alarm. Defining Nootropics Much of the danger surrounding nootropics lies in the struggle to define and classify these substances. Depending on whom you ask, nootropics could include dietary…

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The Hidden Dangers of Infant Walkers — Why Doctors Are Calling For a Ban

Baby walkers may be cute, but experts warn that they’re deceptively dangerous. According to an alarming NPR report, walkers are responsible for over 2,000 hospital emergency room visits every year. Additionally, a study recently published in the journal Pediatrics reveals that 230,000 children under the age of 15 months were treated in United States emergency departments for walker-related injuries such as concussions and skull fractures. Read on to learn more about the dangers of walkers — and how they cause developmental delays. Why Are Walkers So Dangerous? Experts have long regarded walkers as a hazard. Already in 1994, the Consumer…

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Is the E-Cigarette Trend Actually an Epidemic?

Cigarette smoking has seen huge declines in the last few decades, only to be replaced by an alarming alternative: e-cigarettes. Marketed as safer, these battery-operated devices allow users to inhale aerosols, which frequently contain nicotine. New data from the Centers for Disease Control suggests that over nine million American adults regularly vape or smoke e-cigarettes. Perhaps more alarmingly, these products are a hit among teenage smokers — and they often serve as a gateway drug to cigarettes or cigars. Experts worry that e-cigarette use has reached epidemic proportions — are their fears overblown? The Dangers of E-Cigarettes While users largely…

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Thinking of Getting a Hoverboard for Your Child? Think Again…

Since hitting the market in 2015, the self-balancing scooters commonly called hoverboards have been seeing their reputation worsen almost by the day. Most of us have heard the reports of some of these products spontaneously catching fire or exploding due to overheating lithium batteries, prompting several airlines and transit authorities to ban them completely. As recently as last November, the Consumer Product Safety Commission issued yet another recall on numerous brands of hoverboards over fire dangers. However, fire isn’t actually the biggest threat a hoverboard poses to your child—at least from a statistical point of view. It’s injury due to…

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Medical Implant Devices and the FDA: User Beware? (part 2)

We previously discussed an ongoing public health concern where the FDA’s approval process for medical devices appears to be dangerously lacking—to the point that many devices get released to market without a clinical trial. What does this truth mean for you or your loved ones who might need an implanted medical device? What steps can you take to stay safe? Do Your Own Research If your doctor recommends a certain medical device, you don’t have to assume it’s safe because your doctor says so. Find out about the device—not just what it is and what it does, but who makes…

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Medical Implant Devices and the FDA: User Beware? (part 1)

When the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) approves a medical device designed to improve your health, can you assume the device is safe? Not so fast, according to some critics. Modern medicine relies more and more on implantable medical devices to help certain patients—from artificial hips and knees to coronary stents and pacemakers, from cataract lenses to breast implants. Yet remarkably, as author/reporter Jeanne Lenzer points out in a recent interview, less than 1 percent of FDA-approved medical devices even undergo clinical trials. (By comparison, drugs must go through at least two trials prior to approval.) Even devices considered…

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