Seven Common Medication Errors in Nursing Homes

Nursing homes take care of our society’s most vulnerable members. The elderly and permanently disabled may reside in these facilities. Like other health care facilities, nursing homes can be hotspots for medical mistakes. In nursing homes, medication errors are one of the most common types of mistakes made by staff members. Seven common medication errors in nursing homes include: Providing patients with the wrong medications. This type of mistake may occur for several reasons. For instance, a nurse may confuse medications with similar names. Prescribing the wrong dosage. Nurses may give patients too little or too much of a medication….

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Physician Burnout: A Deep Dive (Part II)

Physician burnout is one of the most concerning and least understood issues in the health care industry. We’re here to shed light on this alarming phenomenon. In the first half of our series on burnout, we explored the scope of the problem and explained why it’s getting worse. Now, we’ll show you how physician burnout impacts patients — and what you can do to protect yourself and your loved ones. Physician Burnout and Healthcare Outcomes In a Stanford analysis of a national physician study, over ten percent of respondents confessed to committing major medical errors in the last three months….

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Physician Burnout: A Deep Dive (Part I)

Few professions are mentally or physically more taxing than medicine. Physicians, in particular, face long hours and considerable stress. With over one-quarter of doctors working between 61 and 80 hours per week, it’s easy to see why burnout is at an all-time high. In this two-part article, we’ll investigate the prevalence of burnout and the reasons behind its dramatic rise in the medical profession. How Common Is Physician Burnout? In 2016, the Mayo Clinic published a physician study in which 54.4 percent of respondents admitted to suffering at least one symptom of burnout in 2014. Sometimes, this burnout proves fatal;…

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Parents: Here’s How to Prepare for Flu Season This Year

It is officially flu season. Between the months of October and May, the influenza virus peaks and infects adults and children, although symptoms and severity may vary significantly. The flu is far more dangerous for younger children than the common cold, which is why the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) urges parents to prepare. Listed below are some helpful tips for parents during flu season: Get vaccinated. An annual flu vaccine is one of the most effective ways to protect your family from the flu. The vaccine has been proven to reduce the risk of flu illness, hospitalization…

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Doctors Who Abuse Drugs And Alcohol: By the Numbers

The medical profession is notoriously stressful, especially for physicians and other high-level employees. Unfortunately, many self-medicate in hopes of managing the constant barrage of anxiety. This leaves both medical professionals and the patients they’re charged with protecting at risk. Below, we shed light on the scourge of drugs and alcohol in the health care industry: Prevalence of Abuse Abuse is shockingly common among doctors; in a notable study published in the American Journal on Addictions, 15.3 percent of surveyed physicians met diagnostic criteria for alcohol dependency. Likewise, research indicates that benzodiazepine and opiate abuse rates are higher among doctors than…

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Common Clerical Errors That Cause Medical Injuries: Part II

Clerical mistakes are one of the most common — and least reported — issues in the medical industry. In our last post on the relationship between clerical errors and medical mishaps, we discussed a few of the most common types of mistakes that can harm patients. Now, we dive in deeper with additional examples and statistics — several of which involve modern medical technology. Issues With Electronic Health Records Although designed, in part, with the intention of avoiding clerical issues, electronic health records (EHR) actually cause their fair share of mishaps. Often, these issues arise when transferring information from traditional…

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Five Illnesses That Doctors Often Misdiagnose

When a patient receives medical advice and recommendations, he or she can sometimes assume that the doctor is giving a perfect diagnosis every time. However, human error occurs and there are times where your doctor will make a mistake. Depending on the illness and the combination of symptoms, a doctor could misdiagnose you and the illness you have. 5 Commonly Misdiagnosed Illnesses Parkinson’s disease. Currently no official lab tests can confirm Parkinson’s disease. Because of this, it will be completely up to your doctor to observe your condition and make any decisions based on what you tell them. This makes…

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What Are the Most Common Prescription Drug Errors?

Prescription drugs, when used correctly, can save someone’s life who is suffering from a chronic illness or health condition. Prescription drugs also have the ability to improve a patient’s quality of life and reduce the chances of experiencing serious negative side effects related to their condition. Although medication errors may be common, some of them can be fatal. According to an article by the Mount Sinai Medical Center, five common medication errors in relation to prescription drugs include: 5 Common Prescription Drug Errors Unawareness of expiration dates. Expiration dates are always printed on a drug’s label or bottle, but many…

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How Tired Are Doctors and Nurses, Really? (By the Numbers)

Tired doctors make more mistakes. Intuitively, we know this. And we may have read studies like this one (or related news reports). Yet medical culture still glorifies 28-hour shifts and puts residents through the ringer, often forcing them to work 80-hour weeks, all on an irregular sleep schedule that makes recovery from fatigue harder. The medical field has tried in the past to address this worrying problem, but how much have they achieved in recent years? How Tired Is Your Doctor? Regulations prohibit doctors from working more than 80 hours in a week or in excess of 28 hours in…

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What to Know About Central Line Infections

Central line blood infections are responsible for thousands of deaths each year. Also known as a central venous catheter, central lines are placed in veins near the chest, neck or groin. A central line is inserted into a vein close to the heart to provide medicine or collect blood. These are not to be confused with IVs, which are generally placed near the arm or hands to provide fluids or medicines. A blood infection can occur when pathogens (a virus or bacteria) enter the bloodstream through the central line. There are multiple reasons why central-line infections may occur. Poor sanitation….

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