The Lancet’s Retracted COVID-19 Study And What It Says About Treating a New Disease: Part II

  The debate surrounding possible COVID-19 treatment hydroxychloroquine remains as vicious as ever. In the previous portion of our two-part series on The Lancet‘s ill-fated study, we examined how a lack of available data led to the study being retracted. While this research previously attracted the most attention, other studies still cast doubt on whether the drug is worth pursuing as a treatment option. Alternate Research The Lancet is far from the only publication to examine the role of hydroxychloroquine in COVID-19 treatment. Several other studies also highlight how this drug could be used to assist vulnerable patients — and…

Read More

The Lancet’s Retracted COVID-19 Study And What It Says About Treating a New Disease: Part I

  As the research surrounding COVID-19 reveals new findings, even the most trusted scientific authorities are forced to occasionally walk back previous statements. Such was the case for the trusted publication The Lancet, which previously published a noteworthy study suggesting that drugs such as hydroxychloroquine could pose a significant threat to COVID patients. Keep reading to learn more about The Lancet‘s retracted study — and its implications for future treatments. The Hydroxychloroquine Drama Hydroxychloroquine attracted attention for several months after President Donald Trump touted the drug as an effective treatment for coronavirus. Medical experts quickly dismissed this assertion, stating that…

Read More

The Scientific Debate Over Coronavirus: Part II

  As the science surrounding the coronavirus evolves, disagreements are sure to appear. While many of these have involved the concept of asymptomatic spread — as highlighted in the first half of our two-part series — other sources of contention also limit consensus within the scientific community. Chief among these? The ongoing strength of the disease. Is COVID-19 Conquered in Italy? While it may seem as if the world has lived with the coronavirus for ages, it’s still less than a year old. Much remains unknown about its current — and future — volatility. Italian doctor Alberto Zangrillo made headlines…

Read More

The Scientific Debate Over Coronavirus: Part I

  There’s no denying the inherent frustration of our efforts to halt the spread of the coronavirus. Much of this stems from advice that seems to change on a daily basis. From surface spread to the value of masks, shifting recommendations from the CDC leave many of us deeply confused about how this virus spreads — and what can realistically be done to contain it. Because the coronavirus is novel, many scientists share this overwhelming sense of confusion. While we know far more about the disease than we did just a few short months ago, researchers have yet to reach…

Read More

How Do Doctors Stay Up to Date on Protocol Changes? How Often Do They Fall Behind?

Change is rampant in every industry, but it’s particularly prominent in medicine, where emerging research holds the potential to dramatically alter protocol we currently take for granted. Already, the average physician visit looks little like it did just twenty years ago. Keeping up may seem impossible as a patient, but what about the doctors charged with handling a myriad of medical issues? Unfortunately, their efforts to stay current vary dramatically, as we examine below: Interactions With Fellow Professionals In today’s technological world, word of mouth remains one of the most effective means of keeping up to date with medical developments….

Read More

Stents And Surgery Versus Lifestyle: What Are the Most Effective Treatment Methods for Coronary Heart Disease?

As the leading cause of death in the United States, heart disease prompts over 630,000 fatalities every year. Unfortunately, many of the interventions we currently rely on to mitigate the impact of this deadly condition don’t work nearly as well as promised. In fact, results from a recently released study suggest that lifestyle factors can play a far greater role in treatment than medical interventions such as stents and bypass surgery. Stents And Heart Disease: What the Latest Research Says Presented during the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions conference, a notable NYU Grossman School of Medicine and Stanford University study…

Read More

Common Obstacles to Accessing Health Care Records — And How to Deal With Them

From medical malpractice cases to sheer curiosity, a variety of situations and circumstances may prompt you to seek access to critical health care records. Unfortunately, these can prove surprisingly difficult to obtain — even when the need for access is urgent. Below, we highlight a few obstacles you may face along the way, as well as viable solutions: Noncompliance With HIPAA And Other Regulations A variety of rules and regulations promise to improve patient access to medical records, but far too many hospitals and clinics remain noncompliant. Many patients are never informed of their rights under the Health Insurance Portability…

Read More

Negligent Neurosurgeon Gets 7 years in Prison | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

A Brisbane, Australia court has convicted a surgeon, Dr. Jayant Patel, of three counts of manslaughter and sentenced him to seven years in prison after finding he performed multiple reckless surgeries on Australian patients.  The trial lasted 14 weeks. According to news articles, Dr. Jayant Patel was a neurosurgeon with a  pattern of surgical malpractice stretching back to 1982, including a bowel operation that left one patient unable to pass any food and several patients who died of postoperative bleeding caused by improperly performed surgeries. According to the Brisbane Times’ account of the proceedings, Dr. Patel’s career began with malpractice…

Read More

Genes and Autism May Be Linked | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

Posted by: Salvatore J. Zambri, Esquire Approximately 1 in 150 children are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). According to Medical News Today, three studies compared all of the DNA of people with ASD with that of people who do not, and small genetic differences were discovered that impact the manner in which brain cells connect to make the circuitry of a child’s brain. The largest of the three studies evaluated the DNA of over 10,000 people, states the report. These finding suggest that “genetic differences in how cells in the brain link together could influence susceptibility to ASD on…

Read More