The Dark Side of Artificial Intelligence in Medicine

Artificial intelligence (AI) promises to revolutionize the health care industry. AI’s efficiency and accuracy — combined with human creativity and empathy — could usher in a new era of medical treatment, in which diseases and conditions that once seemed untouchable can finally be addressed. Already, AI systems have produced marked improvements in diagnosis solutions such as X-rays and CAT scans. These may come at a cost, however, as the many opportunities presented by artificial intelligence in medicine are accompanied by a few significant risks. In a perfect world, AI would only be used for good. The unfortunate reality remains, however,…

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Post-COVID Stress And Burnout Among Health Care Workers: How Does it Put Patients at Risk?

During the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, burnout was at an all-time high among health care professionals. This was abundantly clear in the survey “Coping with COVID,” which revealed that 61 percent of health care workers feared transmission. Alarmingly, over one in three of respondents also claimed to suffer anxiety or depression, while 43 percent noted an excessive workload. This wave of post-COVID stress is sure to have real implications on the quality of care delivered. Still, the work environment within medical facilities looks a bit different these days than it did one year ago. Equipment shortages are less common…

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Best Practices to Improve Health in the Hospital

You’ve been admitted to the hospital, and, needless to say, don’t feel your best. Unfortunately, while a variety of targeted treatments promise to resolve your most pressing health concerns, other issues could keep you feeling ill as long as you’re stuck in a clinical environment. Fortunately, there are several small changes you can make in your routine to improve your health while in the hospital Hospital-acquired infections (HAI) are worrisome, of course, but they’re far from the only problems that limit your health at this vulnerable time. Holistic problems such as diet, lack of exercise, and sleep disturbances can also…

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COVID-19 and the Increased Risk of Medical Errors

Could Doctors or Nurses Be Too Distracted By COVID-19 to Provide Proper Care For Non-COVID Patients? Health care professionals face a heavy burden in a time of COVID. Every day, they place themselves at risk of infection as they care for more patients than they’re equipped to handle. Many are alarmingly short on sleep, taking on extra responsibilities to cover for coworkers who have contracted the disease. Even if they manage to remain physically healthy, the sheer mental burden of working in healthcare during a pandemic can be difficult to overcome. Given the unique challenges faced by today’s doctors and…

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How Do Doctors Stay Up to Date on Protocol Changes? How Often Do They Fall Behind?

Change is rampant in every industry, but it’s particularly prominent in medicine, where emerging research holds the potential to dramatically alter protocol we currently take for granted. Already, the average physician visit looks little like it did just twenty years ago. Keeping up may seem impossible as a patient, but what about the doctors charged with handling a myriad of medical issues? Unfortunately, their efforts to stay current vary dramatically, as we examine below: Interactions With Fellow Professionals In today’s technological world, word of mouth remains one of the most effective means of keeping up to date with medical developments….

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How Other Countries Handle Doctor And Hospital Negligence

Medical negligence is an international reality, but it looks considerably different from one country to the next. Certain types of negligence, for example, are more prevalent in some regions than others. When such behavior leads to legal action, malpractice claims may be handled differently based on local legislation. A thorough understanding of these disparities is critical not only when traveling, but also in understanding medical malpractice at home — and how targeted changes could produce better outcomes in hospitals and in court. Medical Malpractice’s Link to Health Care Quality The World Health Organization regards the prevalence of medical malpractice litigation…

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DECODING MEDICAL RECORDS IN MALPRACTICE CASES | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

One of the key tasks we initially perform when investigating a case involving malpractice or abuse at a health care facility is a thorough review of the medical records. Here are a few basic tips to keep in mind when looking at records: COMPLETE CHART The first task is to review the records and try to make sure you have a complete set. Often, the records are incomplete. We check to make sure we have an initial History & Physical, Orders, Physician Progress Notes, Nursing Notes, Laboratory Data, Radiology Reports, Operative Notes, Operative Records/Consent Forms, Pathology, and a Discharge Summary….

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Chiropractic Cervical Manipulation, If Done Wrong, Can Be Deadly | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

Each year in the U.S., 22 million patients are treated by Doctors of Chiropractic,more commonly called chiropractors, or “chiropractic physicians” in some states. It is estimated that there are 52,000 chiropractors currently performing such treatment.  The average chiropractor in private practice performs as many as 50-100 manual vertebral manipulations a day, at a cost of $25 to $40 each. The goal of chiropractic is the diagnosis and correction by manual spinal manipulation or adjustment of a chiropractic condition called “vertebral subluxation.”  Although most chiropractors claim they perform thousands of cervical manipulations annually without any serious complications, malpractice suits have been…

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Negligent Neurosurgeon Gets 7 years in Prison | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

A Brisbane, Australia court has convicted a surgeon, Dr. Jayant Patel, of three counts of manslaughter and sentenced him to seven years in prison after finding he performed multiple reckless surgeries on Australian patients.  The trial lasted 14 weeks. According to news articles, Dr. Jayant Patel was a neurosurgeon with a  pattern of surgical malpractice stretching back to 1982, including a bowel operation that left one patient unable to pass any food and several patients who died of postoperative bleeding caused by improperly performed surgeries. According to the Brisbane Times’ account of the proceedings, Dr. Patel’s career began with malpractice…

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Federal Government Data Shows No Crisis in Medical Malpractice Claims In New York | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

By Salvatore J. Zambri, Esquire In recent years, the insurance companies in New York have claimed that there was a crisis in medical malpractice claims which was essentially putting doctors and hospitals out of business.  Were the claims of the insurance companies true? The answer, according to the federal government claims data, is a resounding “no”. According to a comprehensive report  based on the federal data,  written by Roberto LoBianco and Bill Mahoney of the N.Y. Public Interest Research Group and Arthur Levin of the Center for Medical Consumers.  When you review the actual data from paid medical malpractice claims…

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