Stents And Surgery Versus Lifestyle: What Are the Most Effective Treatment Methods for Coronary Heart Disease?

As the leading cause of death in the United States, heart disease prompts over 630,000 fatalities every year. Unfortunately, many of the interventions we currently rely on to mitigate the impact of this deadly condition don’t work nearly as well as promised. In fact, results from a recently released study suggest that lifestyle factors can play a far greater role in treatment than medical interventions such as stents and bypass surgery. Stents And Heart Disease: What the Latest Research Says Presented during the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions conference, a notable NYU Grossman School of Medicine and Stanford University study…

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Shoulder Pain Pumps Destroy Shoulder Joints | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

Recognized medical studies show that pain pumps that inject pain medicine right into shoulder joints after surgical procedures are a very likely cause of severe cartilage damage.  The FDA, in November 2009 and again in February 2010 issued a warning about this device.  At the heart of the shoulder pain pump litigation is the fact that continuous infusion pumps were not approved by the FDA for this use. The pain medication essentially eats away the cartilage in the shoulder joint which is critical to allowing the shoulder to move smoothly without pain and grinding. The research shows that this permanent…

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Defective Circumcision Equipment Permanently Impairs Young Man | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

A jury in Florida issued a decision last week that, L.G., a Florida infant, was entitled to judgment against Mogen Circumcision Instruments, manufacturer of the popular Mogen clamp.  The device severed the glans of the infant’s penis during a routine circumcision causing permanent and severe medical complications for this young child. The company had previously stated that such an injury was impossible, but the journal Pediatrics, published by the American Academy of Pediatrics, published a 1996 case study detailing a similar injury.  Fortunately, in that case, a skilled urologist was able to reattach the approximately 2mm of glans.  In 2000,…

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New Wand Detects Surgical Instruments Left In Patients | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

According to an article in the Chicago Tribune, a company called RF Surgical Systems of Bellevue, Wash., created the RF Surgical Detection System which is essentially a scanning wand that can be used by surgeons to find any tagged items remaining in a patient. Tags (or seeds) about the size of a rice grain are imbedded in gauze, sponges and the like. One wave of the wand over the patient will reveal if the coast is clear. According to an article in the New England Journal of Medicine, retained objects were reported “1 in 8,801 to 1 in 18,760 inpatient…

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FDA Recalls Biosite’sTriage Cardiac Panel | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

Posted by: Salvatore J. Zambri, Esquire The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reports that Biosite and the FDA have notified medical professionals of a Class 1 recall of the Biosite-brand Triage Cardiac Panel.  This particular panel is a test used by healthcare specialists to diagnose a heart attack (myocardial infarction).  However, according to the FDA, the “use of the affected lot may lead to false negative results with patient samples containing troponin I at very low levels, with CK-MB, and with myoglobin, possibly resulting in missed or incorrect diagnosis. A false negative test result would indicate that a person has…

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FDA Too Lenient On Device Approval | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

Posted by: Salvatore J. Zambri, Esquire An editorial from yesterday’s New York Times challenges the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), suggesting that the agency has been too lenient in approving medical devices.  The article notes that a “vaginal sling,” used to control urinary leaks, that was previously sold by the Mentor Corporation,  a company that was acquired by Johnson & Johnson, has caused serious medical problems for many women throughout the country. In one instance, a woman’s “surgeon inserted a strip of synthetic mesh — Mentor’s ObTape vaginal sling — under her urethra. It stopped the leakage but soon caused…

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Hearing Tomorrow On Medical Device Safety Act of 2009 | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

Posted by: Salvatore J. Zambri, Esquire The Subcommittee on Health will hold a hearing tomorrow regarding The Medical Device Safety Act of 2009.   This is an important piece of legislation that should become law. We encourage our readers to contact their representatives in Congress and urge them to vote in favor of the bill. The Medical Device Safety Act of 2009 is important for two principal reasons.  First, it will allow every American patient to hold manufacturers of defective medical devices accountable for injuries and deaths caused by unsafe products.  It will also prevent the manufacturers of defective devices from…

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Revelations on Genetic Risks of IVF | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

Posted by: Salvatore J. Zambri, Esquire For nearly thirty years, in-vitro fertilization (IVF) has been consider relatively safe.  A recent report in the New York Times, however, reports that new epidemiological studies and scientific techniques have revealed findings that suggest that “there may be some abnormal patterns of gene expression associated with IVF and a possible increase in rare but devastating genetic disorders that appear to be directly linked to those unusual gene expression patterns.”  The report also states that, with IVF, there “appears to be an increased risk of premature birth and of babies with low birth weight for…

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FDA Meets To Discuss Device Approval | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

Posted by: Salvatore J. Zambri, Esquire The New York Times reported recently that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will conduct a rare meeting to discuss its device division, which is responsible for–among other things–evaluating, monitoring, and regulating medical devices.  According to the report, Dr. Donna-Bea Tillman, the agency’s director of device evaluation, called an “all-hands” meeting.  This comes in response to a letter from nine scientists who have written President Obama, charging that some in the agency have acted illegally, exposing the public to harmful, even deadly, products. In the letter to President Obama, the scientists claimed that the…

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