Virginia Tech’s New Youth Helmet Ratings: What They Mean For Young Athletes

Parents of football players and other athletes are understandably concerned about traumatic brain injury and a whole host of other issues. Some take solace in knowing that helmets can provide valuable protection for vulnerable young athletes. Unfortunately, not all helmets stack up. In an effort to clear up the confusion, Virginia Tech recently released a thorough collection of ratings demonstrating which helmets are the most effective. The culmination of a decade of research, these ratings could be a critical resource for parents and coaches looking to keep young athletes safe. How Were the Ratings Obtained? Virginia Tech’s team sought ratings…

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Timely Facts About Fall Sports Head Injuries

From Little League to the NFL, traumatic brain injuries are increasingly of concern in all levels of athletics. Highlighted below, recent statistics shed light on the scope of the problem: Injuries On the Rise Traumatic brain injuries have plagued athletes for decades, but all signs point to an increase in prevalence. Data from the High School Reporting Information Online injury surveillance system indicates that participation in main high school athletic categories increased 1.04 fold between 2005 and 2015; meanwhile, concussions in these sports increased a shocking 2.2 fold. Not Just Football When most people think about sport-related brain injuries, they…

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How Do I Know When I Can Drive Again After a Serious Brain Injury?

After sustaining a brain injury, your life can be put on hold. You may want to know when or if you can go back to your normal routine. One of the biggest concerns after a brain injury is when you can drive again. Depending on the severity of your brain injury, multiple factors will affect when you will be able to drive safely again. What Is the Most Common Question Regarding a Brain Injury and Driving? Will my driving privileges and/or driver’s license be taken away after my brain injury? Just because you have a brain injury doesn’t mean that…

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Resources for Cerebral Palsy, Including Information in Spanish | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

Cerebral means having to do with the brain. Palsy means weakness or problems with using the muscles. A recent CDC study shows that the average prevalence of CP is 3.3 per 1,000 8-year-old children or 1 in 303 children.   Click here to listen to a podcast on Cerebral Palsy. What Are Some of the Signs of Cerebral Palsy? According to the CDC, “the signs of cerebral palsy vary greatly.  The main sign is a delay reaching the motor or movement milestones. Click here for a milestone checklist and here for the spanish version. A child over 2 months with cerebral…

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Brain Injuries in Children on the Rise | DC Metro Area Personal Injury Law Blog

According to the Centers for Disease Control, as many as 3.8 million traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) result from sports and recreation activities in the U.S. each year. Of those children, approximately 165,000 require hospitalization. The most frequent causes of TBI are related to: car accidents falls sports related injuries; and abuse/assault. It can be difficult for a parent to diagnose this type of injury as many children do not demonstrate visible impairments after a head injury. The symptoms depend on the extent and location of the brain injury and can vary greatly. Children who suffered TBI may experience some or…

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Window for Clot-Busting Drug tPA Opened | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

Posted by: Salvatore J. Zambri, Esquire The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association has established a new guideline, based on European studies,  concerning when a clot-busting drug known as tPA can be given intravenously to stroke victims. Previously, the guideline in America was to provide the drug only within three hours of the onset of symptoms, otherwise, it could do more harm than good.  This posed a problem to patients who, for one reason or another, could not get to a hospital quickly enough following the start of stroke symptoms.  The new guideline extends the time in which the drug can…

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