3 Warning Signs of Nursing Home Abuse

Nursing home abuse may be one of your worst fears. When you place your loved one in a nursing home, you want to know that they are being well cared for. Yet often nursing home abuse and neglect takes place without the loved ones ever knowing about it. Here’s what you need to look for when you visit your loved one to determine if they are being abused or neglected. Signs of Elder Abuse One of the biggest signs of elder abuse is change in behavior. Your loved one may suddenly display symptoms similar to dementia, with mumbling, sucking their…

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Study Shows Poor Infection Control in Nursing Homes Linked to Lower Staffing Levels | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

Infections in nursing homes kill 400,000 residents a year according to a recent study published in the American Journal of Infection Control.   The authors contend that nearly one-sixth of the US nursing homes have significant deficiencies in infection control.  Over 100,000 patient encounters were reviewed.  The University of Pittsburgh Public Health program researchers analyzed records from 2000 through 2007 and found that infection control citations in 96% of US nursing homes were linked to lower nursing staff levels. Infections are leading cause of morbidity and mortality in U.S. nursing homes.  This study reminds us of the direct link between professional…

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100,000 Lives Lost Each Year Due to Dirty Hospitals and Nursing Homes | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

Each year 100,000 patients in hospitals and nursing homes in this country die from infection they acquired after being in a health care facility.  This is the most common complication of hospital care and also one of the deadliest risks for patients according to government officials. In addition the loss of lives, the cost for our health care system is enormous. The estimated annual cost for hospital acquired infections is between $28 and $33 billion. What is even more shocking and tragic is that the consensus in the US medical community is that most of these infections are preventable.  How…

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DC Nursing Homes: How to Report Abuse or Neglect | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

The District of Columbia Department of Health licenses and certifies health care facilities for compliance with state and federal health and safety standards. Facilities include nursing homes, hospitals, home health agencies, dialysis centers, ambulatory surgical centers, intermediate care facilities for the mentally retarded, and laboratories. The Health Care Facilities Division (“HCFD”) is charged with conducting regular on-site surveys to ensure health, safety, sanitation, fire, and quality of care requirements. HCFD identifies deficiencies that may affect state licensure. The D.C. government publishes a list of nursing home facilities in DC and also has a list of home health agencies in DC….

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NC Nursing Home Faced With Resident Injuries and Deaths | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

Britthaven of Chapel Hill, a Chapel Hill, North Carolina nursing home, employed Angela Almore, R.N., a nurse who now faces second-degree murder and patient-abuse charges arising from her time at Britthaven. Several patients under her care were injured and one died, after allegedly being administered morphine without a prescription. At the same nursing home, Marian Orlowski, M.D. died of pneumonia after falling and breaking several bones while a resident at Britthaven.  His wife has taken action to hold Britthaven accountable for failing to use side-rails on Dr. Orlowski’s bed because Britthaven knew that he suffered from dementia and was a…

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Stop C. Difficile: Education and Hand Washing Saves Lives | DC Metro Area Medical Malpractice Law Blog

Clostridium difficile or “C. diff.”  killed more patients in England in 2006 than MRSA. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported a nearly twofold increase in C. diff infections from 1996 to 2003 in the U.S.The same hyper-virulent strain, dubbed ribotype 027, has invaded some hospitals in the U.S.C. diff. infections kill an estimated 5,000 people in the U.S. per year, the CDC reports. C. diff has been causing trouble for several years. The mortality rate from this disease is rising. What do we know about this enemy? Outside of hospitals and nursing homes, it is only found in the…

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