Practice Food Safety This Memorial Day Weekend

Now that summer is here, it is time for picnics and BBQ’s in the beautiful weather– but be careful to not let food poisoning spoil the fun. The USDA would like to remind people that summer is the season with the highest prevalence of food-borne disease. This is because illness-causing bacteria thrive at warm summer temperatures, and as people begin eating outdoors more frequently, food is exposed to less sanitary conditions. For example, the CDC states that Salmonella, which causes 1 million food-borne illnesses annually, occurs more in the summer due to poor food storage and preservation. Additionally, while most food-borne…

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Game Day Food Safety Tips

The Super Bowl may be over, but the threat of bacteria in your game day food is far from gone! The buffet, potluck-style format of gatherings during big sports events can be a breeding ground for germs and illnesses. Proper food safety is key to staying safe during your next game day. Follow these tips for a stress-free sports party! Always Practice Cleanliness Not paying enough attention to cleanliness can lead to the spread of bacteria in game day food. You don’t want to share the dip with someone who doesn’t wash their hands! Always remember to properly clean your…

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Food Safety Education Month – Key Things to Know

Foodborne illness is no joke; every year, these diseases strike one in six Americans. Of these, 128,000 end up in the hospital and at least 3,000 die. During Food Safety Education Month, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention alerts Americans to the risks everyday meals can pose. This year, don’t ignore the problem; read on to learn how you can protect yourself and your loved ones. Food Should Be Cooked And Served at the Right Temperature You regularly check the temperature of meals while cooking, but what about when serving a meal? Both are important. According to…

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CDC: Romaine Lettuce E. coli Outbreak Appears to Be Over

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) declared that the recent outbreak of E. coli (Escherichia coli) that affected romaine lettuce grown in the Yuma, Arizona region appears to be over. By May 8, there were 149 confirmed cases of E. coli food poisoning linked to romaine lettuce from this part of the US. of E. coli food poisoning. The CDC recorded 210 total cases during the outbreak. According to the CDC, the strain of E. coli (E. coli O157:H7) responsible for the outbreak was especially virulent and can lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome. This is a potentially fatal…

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Global Food Supply Poses Serious Health Risks | DC Metro Area Personal Injury Law Blog

Leading scientists at last week’s Total Health Show 2009, held in Toronto, warned that changes to the global food supply are desperately needed to avoid serious health risks, according to a report in Medical News Today.  One world-known scientist–Dr. Shiv Chopra– stated that the removal of “antibiotics, hormones, slaughterhouse waste, genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and pesticides, would transform the safety and sustainability of the food supply,” notes the report. According to Dr. Chopra and others, the infusion of these unnecessary products is driven “less by need and more by the profit motives of major corporations.” Genetically engineered foods are flooding…

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Are We Safe? U.S. Has a Patchwork of Food Safety Inspection Systems | DC Metro Area Personal Injury Law Blog

By Salvatore J. Zambri, Esquire Your chances of getting sick from tainted food may depend on how diligent your state inspection system is, according to an article in the New York Times this week.  “The longer it takes you to nail an outbreak, the more people are going to get sick,” said Dr. David Acheson, associate commissioner for foods at the Food and Drug Administration. “And if it’s a pathogen that causes death, more people are going to die.”  Dr. Robert Tauxe, deputy director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s division of food-borne diseases, said the agency planned…

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