Peloton Agrees to Recall All Treadmills

“Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled Tread+ and contact Peloton for a full refund until November 6, 2022.” Following the tragic death of a 6-year-old child who was pulled under the rear of the Tread+ treadmill, and an additional 72 similar, non-fatal reports involving adult users, children, pets, and household objects, Peloton entered into a voluntary agreement with the Consumer Product Safety Commission (“CPSC”) to recall its Tread+ treadmills. In 2018, Peloton originally launched the treadmill as the “Peloton Tread.” In September 2020, the company renamed the treadmill to the “Peloton Tread+.” Currently, there are approximately 125,000 units in…

Read More

Supreme Court Makes Suing Corporations Over Defective and Dangerous Products Easier

  The Supreme Court recently released a unanimous 8-0 ruling that will help individuals injured by defective and dangerous products overcome jurisdictional hurdles in filing a lawsuit. The case, Ford Motor Co. v. Montana Eighth Judicial District Court, involved two car accidents – one occurring in Montana and another in Minnesota. The first accident involved a driver traveling near her home when her Ford Explorer’s tread suddenly separated from a read tire. The second incident stemmed from a Ford vehicle with an air bag that failed to deploy. The consolidated lawsuits were each brought in the states where the respective…

Read More

Safe Toy Buying Tips for the Holidays

With the holidays and shopping season right around the corner, excitement about toys and gift-giving continues to grow. At such a beautiful time of year, the last thing we would want would be for the toys and gifts we give to cause harm to our loved ones. Thanks to recent toy safety advocacy and awareness, there were only 12 toy recalls in 2019 compared to 172 in 2008. While this is certainly something to celebrate, toy-related injuries continue to be a problem. The CPSC reported that in 2018 (the most recent data available), there were 226,100 toy-related injuries treated in…

Read More

Hepatitis A Risk: Aldi Grocery Stores and Raley’s Family of Fine Foods Recall Frozen Berries

Posted by Salvatore J. Zambri, founding member and partner. Aldi Grocery Stores and Raley’s Family of Fine Foods recently voluntarily recalled all frozen raspberries and frozen berry mixes containing raspberries made by Wawona Frozen Foods because of a potential risk of Hepatitis A contamination. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provide an overview of Hepatitis A: Hepatitis A is a vaccine-preventable, communicable disease of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). It is usually transmitted person-to-person through the fecal-oral route   or consumption of contaminated food or water. Hepatitis A is a self-limited disease that does not…

Read More

Preventing Halloween Costume-Related Injuries

When you picture top Halloween safety issues, you probably imagine drunk drivers or laced candy. In reality, however, the very costumes your children wear while trick-or-treating may pose the greatest risk of all. The following are among the most dangerous costumes worth avoiding this year: Floor-Length Outfits Costumes that drag behind kids can serve as a major tripping hazard. Yes, it’s annoying to hem up ill-fitting outfits, but it’s far worse to see your children trip and fall. Cosmetic Contact Lenses Older children or teens may beg for cosmetic lenses that turn their eyes spooky colors. Like any contacts, however,…

Read More

Federal Appeals Court Rules Amazon Not Liable for Defective Third-Party Products

In 2014, a Maryland couple’s house was burned down by a headlamp purchased on Amazon. The couple sued Amazon for damages, but Amazon asserted that the Chinese company that manufactured the product was at fault. A Maryland judge sided with Amazon, stating that Amazon was only the platform for selling the product and never actually owned the product. The couple appealed the ruling, but the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond agreed with the original decision. Amazon and Product Liability This isn’t the first time Amazon has had trouble with product liability allegations. In 2016, a Tennessee family’s…

Read More

Metro Removes and Subsequently Reinstates 3000-Series Cars

On Tuesday, the Washington Metro Area Transit Authority (“Metro”) took all of its 3000-series cars out of service after receiving a report that a car door had slid open on an Orange Line train on Sunday. According to The Washington Post, Metro first became aware of the incident after a rider posted a video of the open door on social media on Monday, and later confirmed the malfunction with camera footage at the Dunn Loring station. Metro’s General Manager, Paul Wiedefeld, said in a news conference on Tuesday that the removal of the 3000-series cars was temporary, and that Metro was unsure…

Read More

Replacement Takata Airbag Recall: What You Need to Know (Part II)

Honda recently issued a recall of vehicles equipped with replacement Takata airbags, but this is far from the first time Takata and Honda have faced issues — and it’s just one facet of an ordeal involving many automakers. In our last blog on the recent airbag recall, we explored the circumstances surrounding the defective replacement airbags. Now, we’ll delve into the broader trend of airbag inflator malfunctions. Airbag Inflator Injuries: By the Numbers The 2018 crash that prompted the latest Takata recall is just one in a series of incidents involving airbag inflators. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety…

Read More

New EPA Restrictions on Methylene Chloride: What Is It and Why Is It Dangerous?

From bathtub refinishing to furniture stripping, methylene chloride takes center stage in a variety of household projects. Increasingly, however, health authorities are alerting the public to the substance’s dangers — and claiming that it’s to blame for a myriad of tragic deaths. What Is Methylene Chloride? Why Should Consumers Avoid It? Sometimes referred to as dichloromethane or DCM, methylene chloride is a solvent used in a wide array of products. It is most commonly seen in paint strippers, but can also be used in adhesives such as acrylic cement. The substance is also sometimes seen in automotive and general cleaning…

Read More

Nootropics: How Safe Are They, Exactly?

In a competitive workforce and academic sphere, employees and students are more desperate than ever to gain an edge on the competition. Several believe that nootropics — drugs specifically designed to enhance cognitive function — represent that edge. Proponents claim that nootropics are highly beneficial and 100 percent safe, but a growing body of research suggests otherwise. Read on to learn more about these drugs — and why experts are sounding the alarm. Defining Nootropics Much of the danger surrounding nootropics lies in the struggle to define and classify these substances. Depending on whom you ask, nootropics could include dietary…

Read More