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Hot Car Deaths: An Ongoing Threat to Children

Local Hot Car Deaths As reported by NBCWashington.com, a 5-year-old boy recently died from heat stroke after being left in his mother’s SUV in Springfield, VA.  The temperature outside was 93 degrees with a 100+ degree heat index.  The child was left inside the vehicle for several hours as the temperatures rose well above 100 degrees. In 2007, a Virginia child died after the mother forgot him inside a car.  The outside temperature was only 66 degrees but the temperature inside the car climbed to 120 degrees.  Hot car deaths are a continuous threat in the metropolitan area, especially for…

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2.4 Million Dehumidifiers Recalled

Recalled AeonAir Dehumidifier U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (“CPSC”) recalled approximately 2.4 million dehumidifiers as of August, 2021. These dehumidifiers were made by 20 different brands and sold nationwide in stores such as Costco, Lowes, Menards, Walmart, and others. As reported by CBSnews.com, the dehumidifiers sold from February, 2009 to August, 2017. The recall is due to over 100 incidents of products overheating and catching fire.  The Chinese manufacturing company, New Widetech, reports roughly $17 million in property damage and no injuries. Notable brands that are being recalled include: AeonAir, Danby, Friedrich, Honeywell, and Whirlpool. To find out if you…

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The Dark Side of Artificial Intelligence in Medicine

Artificial intelligence (AI) promises to revolutionize the health care industry. AI’s efficiency and accuracy — combined with human creativity and empathy — could usher in a new era of medical treatment, in which diseases and conditions that once seemed untouchable can finally be addressed. Already, AI systems have produced marked improvements in diagnosis solutions such as X-rays and CAT scans. These may come at a cost, however, as the many opportunities presented by artificial intelligence in medicine are accompanied by a few significant risks. In a perfect world, AI would only be used for good. The unfortunate reality remains, however,…

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Post-COVID Stress And Burnout Among Health Care Workers: How Does it Put Patients at Risk?

During the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, burnout was at an all-time high among health care professionals. This was abundantly clear in the survey “Coping with COVID,” which revealed that 61 percent of health care workers feared transmission. Alarmingly, over one in three of respondents also claimed to suffer anxiety or depression, while 43 percent noted an excessive workload. This wave of post-COVID stress is sure to have real implications on the quality of care delivered. Still, the work environment within medical facilities looks a bit different these days than it did one year ago. Equipment shortages are less common…

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Top Dangers Button Batteries Pose for Kids — And How to Reduce the Risk

Take a quick look around your home. How many items are powered by batteries? Of these, how many contain small, disc-shaped batteries? These “button batteries” lurk nearly everywhere — and they could be turning your home into a dangerous environment. Many parents are just now becoming aware of the danger small batteries can pose for children. Toddlers, in particular, are at risk any time they play with toys that contain button cells. The urgency of the issue can be seen in the formation of a national Button Battery Task Force. Since then, manufacturers have stepped up their game by implementing…

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Most Dangerous Intersections in Washington, DC

These are the most dangerous intersections in Washington, DC Although the city has a reliable public transportation system and a strong and growing community of bicyclists, the number one mode of transportation around Washington DC is still the automobile.  Every day, tens of thousands of Washingtonians take to the streets to head to work or go to the supermarket or numerous other destinations. Add to that the number of drivers who come into the city from outside either for work or to see the sights of our nation’s capital and you have a large amount of vehicles surging through the…

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New Bike Laws Take Effect July 1st in Virginia

New bike laws in Virginia now in effect: what you need to know When bikers are on the road, everyone shares a responsibility for their safety. Even when they practice every recommended precaution and follow all traffic laws, they still place an immense trust in the capabilities and awareness of nearby drivers. Sadly, drivers can be reckless and accidents do happen. In 2019, the Virginia DMV reported 651 crashes involving bicycles, with 13 resulting in fatalities. Two new bike laws passed by the state legislature this year aim to reduce the danger to cyclists on the open road. If you…

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The Gender Gap in Medical Trials: What to Know

When you examine medical research — or place your trust in health care providers who delve into this research on your behalf — you trust that experts have taken every step necessary to control for variables that might affect the results. Unfortunately, while many studies are trustworthy, some researchers neglect to account for factors that can have a huge impact on outcomes. This, in turn, may affect the health of countless patients. Often, those who bear the brunt of the damage are female, thanks to an enduring gender gap in medical trials. Researchers from the University of Chicago and the…

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Best Practices to Improve Health in the Hospital

You’ve been admitted to the hospital, and, needless to say, don’t feel your best. Unfortunately, while a variety of targeted treatments promise to resolve your most pressing health concerns, other issues could keep you feeling ill as long as you’re stuck in a clinical environment. Fortunately, there are several small changes you can make in your routine to improve your health while in the hospital Hospital-acquired infections (HAI) are worrisome, of course, but they’re far from the only problems that limit your health at this vulnerable time. Holistic problems such as diet, lack of exercise, and sleep disturbances can also…

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Mild Concussions and Brain Aging: What the Latest Research Says

Concussions, like many injuries, exist on a spectrum. In the mildest cases, the injured are fortunate enough to avoid any loss of consciousness or serious lasting effects. Soon after the concussion, they resume their daily life, free of further complaints as if it had never occurred. Meanwhile, the worst concussions can either be deadly or result in irreparable harm, beginning with a loss of consciousness and later leading to life-changing physical or mental damage. Furthermore, research is beginning to suggest that there may be a link between even mild concussions and accelerated brain aging. For many years, the neurological community…

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