The Murder Hornet Scare — What Can It Teach Us About the Threat of Exotic Insects?

Coronavirus is frightening enough as is, but it’s far from the only danger that has the public worried. A new issue recently took over the news to give us a break from the pandemic headlines: murder hornets. While the name is terrifying, these exotic insects may not be as big of a threat as they seem.

What Are Murder Hornets?

Officially known as vespa mandarinia, the so-called murder hornet is actually quite common in many regions of Asia. In several countries, the insect is typically referred to as the ‘giant hornet.’ This name is arguably more accurate than the exaggerated American nickname, as the likelihood of being killed by one of these insects is far smaller than most people realize.

Murder hornets can be identified by their orange heads and bodies, which also feature black bands. Much of the fear surrounding these insects stems from their stingers, which are considerably longer than those found on honeybees.

When Are Murder Hornets Dangerous?

While their stingers can sometimes puncture clothing, murder hornets are not as deadly as their name suggests. They do, however, pose a considerable threat to those who are allergic to bee stings. Both types of stings could potentially lead to anaphylaxis.

It’s perfectly sensible to be wary of murder hornets, but such concerns should be taken into context. Very few people succumb to hornet stings in an average year. If you’re allergic, arm yourself with epinephrine. Otherwise, resist the urge to freak out the next time you see an unfamiliar insect.

Threats abound these days, but the most dangerous are often the most insidious — and the least likely to hit headlines. When these dangers involve negligence, it is imperative that you seek guidance from a trusted personal injury attorney. Contact Regan Zambri Long PLLC today to get started.