The Physical Risks of Economic Stressors: Part II

The economic stressors of the coronavirus pandemic have already prompted emotional distress on a broad scale. Unfortunately, this mental health burden will almost certainly increase our susceptibility to future physical issues. Chronic conditions, in particular, are bound to strike those who have suffered at the financial level.

In the first segment of this series on the interplay of economic stressors and physical suffering, we examined the research underscoring this connection. Next, we’ll look at the specific conditions that financial issues can exacerbate:

Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes represents one of the nation’s most deadly health concerns. Diagnoses are far more prevalent among low-income families, as evidenced by an analysis of data from the famed Whitehall II study. Experts believe that higher rates of obesity among poverty-stricken individuals dramatically increase their risk of developing diabetes.

Heart Disease

While poverty is widely regarded as a chief risk factor for heart disease, those with higher incomes are by no means immune. Financial shocks can impact heart health at all levels of the socioeconomic spectrum.

Research highlighted by the American Heart Association reveals dramatic increases in mortality risk in the midst of an issue known as wealth shock. Typically occurring during recessions, these shocks may involve sudden losses in stock value or retirement savings. This volatility is believed to increase the likelihood of suffering heart attacks and other harmful cardiovascular events.

Furthermore, a clear correlation exists between the number of sudden income drops and the prevalence of cardiovascular damage. This is of clear concern to those who already suffered economic setbacks during the Great Recession.

If you’re currently dealing with economic stress related to COVID-19, the last thing you need is to suffer further losses due to somebody else’s negligence. Contact the team at Regan Zambri Long PLLC for more information.