What Serological Tests Tell Us About the COVID-19 Pandemic

 

Coronavirus dominates today’s headlines, with many top stories delving into alarming delays or malfunctions for the tests we so desperately need. While many people believe that an early lack of testing exacerbated the problem in the United States, this issue is finally being addressed. Serological tests, in particular, promise to grant the medical community vital information about the disease’s current status.

What Are Serological Tests? How Do They Work?

Designed to measure antibodies present within the blood as infected individuals fight COVID-19, serological tests can determine immune response and its implications for recovery. These tests don’t focus on uncovering the disease’s presence, but rather, on how the body responds once infected.

While serological tests cannot be depended on for diagnosis, they remain vital to the ongoing battle against COVID-19. These tests can help health care professionals determine who has already been infected, who has recovered, and whether a sufficient immune response exists. Eventually, such tests may reveal whether those who have already recovered can return to work or even aid in treatment efforts involving convalescent plasma.

The Latest Progress with Serological Tests

The FDA has already utilized an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for serological tests designed for use in clinical laboratories. Since then, dozens of developers have notified the agency that they’ve developed tests. Abbott, for example, uses ARCHITECT i000SR and i2000SR instruments to produce over 100 serological tests per hour. Unfortunately, experts at the World Health Organization (WHO) caution that we should not be overly reliant on serological tests, as their ability to detect immunity may be limited.

While there’s a lot to be said for the bravery of the health care community, medical malpractice remains an unfortunate reality during these difficult times. As a victim, you still have the option of pursuing damages. Contact Regan Zambri Long PLLC today to learn more.