1 in 6 Ride-Sharing Vehicles Have Safety Recalls but Remain in Service

A recent Consumer Reports study looked at vehicle registration for ride-sharing companies in Seattle and New York, and found that 16.2% of vehicles in service had at least one or more active safety recalls. The total number of vehicles surveyed in the study with safety recalls was 15,175. One car in service in Seattle had over 5 different open safety recalls, including one for a defective Takata airbag. Overall, the percentage of recalled vehicles on the road for Lyft and Uber is actually lower than other car-hire services such as the traditional taxi industry. However, the scale and frequent use of…

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Gen Z Behind the Wheel: A Look at the Statistics, Dangers, and Opportunities

Move over millennials — a new generation is about to take over. Born in the late 90s and early 2000s, Gen Z holds a fiercely independent streak and a deep awareness of technology as it relates to personal branding. Although slow to take to the road compared to other generations, today’s young adults are beginning to adapt to the vehicular world. We’ve observed the following as they get behind the wheel: Lower Rates of Drunk Driving Today’s roads are safer because members of Gen Z know better than to drive while intoxicated — or at least, they’re willing to take…

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The Surprising Physical Dangers of Parenting

Few experiences match the highs and lows of parenting, which can simultaneously deliver unthinkable joy and unthinkable exhaustion. Unfortunately, that exhaustion can have a detrimental impact on our physical and mental health, as can other parenting concerns. Below, we outline a few of the most significant physical dangers today’s parents face: Sleep Deprivation By far the greatest hazard of parenting during the first few months, sleep deprivation has a discernible physical and mental impact on drowsy parents. Those who struggle to rest may be more prone to problematic behaviors behind the wheel, such as speeding or failing to come to…

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May Is Stroke Awareness Month: What You Need to Know

May is Stroke Awareness Month, and for good reason — many people have no idea the true extent of the havoc strokes wreak on American adults. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in twenty United States deaths can be attributed to stroke. Read on to learn the basics, including symptoms and common risk factors. Who Is at Risk? A variety of factors can increase your risk of suffering a stroke. Some are not within your control, such as: Age: The older you get, the greater your risk of experiencing a stroke. Race: African Americans are more…

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Practice Food Safety This Memorial Day Weekend

Now that summer is here, it is time for picnics and BBQ’s in the beautiful weather– but be careful to not let food poisoning spoil the fun. The USDA would like to remind people that summer is the season with the highest prevalence of food-borne disease. This is because illness-causing bacteria thrive at warm summer temperatures, and as people begin eating outdoors more frequently, food is exposed to less sanitary conditions. For example, the CDC states that Salmonella, which causes 1 million food-borne illnesses annually, occurs more in the summer due to poor food storage and preservation. Additionally, while most food-borne…

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100 Deadliest Days for Driving Teens Begins Memorial Day

This Memorial Day weekend marks the beginning of a season where rates of car crash-related deaths among teens tragically rise. Dubbed ‘the 100 deadliest days’ by AAA, the time from Memorial Day until Labor Day sees a 14% increase in teenage auto accident related deaths when compared to other periods of time. This meant that an average of 1,022 deaths occurred from auto collisions which included teens between 2010 and 2014 during this season. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. A study from AAA using the same data found that , This problem is caused primarily by distracted teens with insufficient…

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Metro Removes and Subsequently Reinstates 3000-Series Cars

On Tuesday, the Washington Metro Area Transit Authority (“Metro”) took all of its 3000-series cars out of service after receiving a report that a car door had slid open on an Orange Line train on Sunday. According to The Washington Post, Metro first became aware of the incident after a rider posted a video of the open door on social media on Monday, and later confirmed the malfunction with camera footage at the Dunn Loring station. Metro’s General Manager, Paul Wiedefeld, said in a news conference on Tuesday that the removal of the 3000-series cars was temporary, and that Metro was unsure…

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How Meditation Can Help Medical Professionals Avoid Mistakes

Today’s health care workers face unprecedented levels of stress, with many turning to alcohol, food, or other unhealthy behaviors to cope. In the midst of these issues, it’s no wonder that medical errors remain the third-leading cause of death in America. While structural shifts in scheduling and workload can make a huge difference, we might not see these much-needed changes for years. Until then, another solution may help: meditation. Medical Errors: How Common Are They And What Role Does Stress Play? Researchers at Johns Hopkins estimate that medical errors account for over 250,000 deaths every year. Stress could be partially…

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Common Medication Errors: How You Can Avoid Top Dangers at Home

If you’re anything like most Americans, you have a medicine cabinet chock full of pills — and you take at least one every day. One wrong move, however, and the drugs you rely on could prove deadly. Medication errors are far too common, but they’re nearly always preventable. The following are among the most common mistakes involving prescription drugs: Overdose Overdoses are responsible for a significant portion of drug-related injuries and deaths. These can occur due to doctor or pharmacist mistakes — but user error is often to blame. Overdoses can best be avoided by only taking prescribed drugs at…

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Virginia Tech’s New Youth Helmet Ratings: What They Mean For Young Athletes

Parents of football players and other athletes are understandably concerned about traumatic brain injury and a whole host of other issues. Some take solace in knowing that helmets can provide valuable protection for vulnerable young athletes. Unfortunately, not all helmets stack up. In an effort to clear up the confusion, Virginia Tech recently released a thorough collection of ratings demonstrating which helmets are the most effective. The culmination of a decade of research, these ratings could be a critical resource for parents and coaches looking to keep young athletes safe. How Were the Ratings Obtained? Virginia Tech’s team sought ratings…

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