Here’s What You Should Know Before Celebrating on St. Patrick’s Day

St. Patrick’s Day is one of the biggest party nights of the year. Drunk driving accidents are also very common on this holiday. For victims of drunk driving accidents, there are local laws that can help them recover compensation for their injuries or losses.

Under D.C. Code Annotated Section 25-781, it is illegal to sell or deliver alcoholic drinks to:

  • A person who is already intoxicated.
  • A person who appears to be intoxicated.
  • “A person of notoriously intemperate habits,” which is also known as a “habitual drunkard” in other states.

Other provisions of this law bar vendors from selling alcohol to a minor under 21. Minors are also barred from drinking alcohol on the vendor’s property. Violating this law can result in harsh penalties for vendors, including fines and a suspended alcohol license.

A bar’s liability could come into play if you are injured due to a vendor selling an intoxicated person alcohol.

DUI Accident Liability and Private St. Patrick’s Day Parties

Washington, D.C. does not allow civil liability claims against social hosts if an intoxicated guest caused injuries, even if the injured person is a minor. Third-party claims can only be brought against public alcohol vendors, not against individual people who served alcohol on their private property. If you are injured by an intoxicated person at a friend’s St. Patrick’s Day party, then you cannot bring a claim against the property owner. However, you can bring a claim against the driver.

There is a statute of limitations for filing dram shop claims in D.C., meaning you only have a limited amount of time to seek compensation. If you are interested in filing a dram shop claim due to injuries you sustained in a car accident or slip and fall, call Regan Zambri Long PLLC determine your best course of action. Fill out our contact form for a free consultation or call us at (202) 463-3030.

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