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Woman Awarded $417 Million in Johnson & Johnson Talcum Powder Lawsuit

Posted By Regan Zambri Long, PLLC || 31-Aug-2017

A Los Angeles jury has awarded a woman $417 million from a Johnson & Johnson talcum powder lawsuit. Several other lawsuits have been filed against Johnson & Johnson over allegations that its talcum baby powder products cause ovarian cancer. Although there have been several other multimillion dollar verdicts from these lawsuits, this is by far the largest.

The plaintiff in this case was a 63-year-old medical receptionist who had used Johnson & Johnson’s talcum baby powder for several decades. She developed ovarian cancer in 2007, which eventually became terminal. During a video-recorded deposition, the woman described how she had used the product since she was 11 years old. She stopped using the talcum powder in 2016 after watching a news story about a woman who developed ovarian cancer while using the product.

The jury awarded the woman almost $70 million in compensatory damages and $347 million in punitive damages after determining there was a connection between the talcum powder and her ovarian cancer. Johnson & Johnson claims it will try to overturn the verdict.

According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer, talcum powder is classified as a possible human carcinogen when it is used in the genital area. It is theorized that talc, a naturally occurring mineral, can travel to the ovaries and cause inflammation. This inflammation is believed to cause ovarian cancer.

Can I File a Johnson & Johnson Talcum Powder Lawsuit?

Consumer product manufacturers are legally obligated to ensure their goods are free of dangerous defects. In cases where consumer products cause injuries or deaths, victims of these defects or their family members may be able to file product liability lawsuits. The Washington DC product liability attorneys at Regan Zambri Long, PLLC have secured multiple verdicts and settlements for people who were harmed by dangerous consumer products.

Categories: Product Liability
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