Blog

CDC Summarizes Hepatitis A Outbreak Related to Tropical Smoothie Cafe Strawberries

Posted By Regan Zambri Long, PLLC || 16-Sep-2016

http://www.rhllaw.com/images/import/photo__1014130_sal_1896_lr.jpg

Posted by Salvatore J. Zambri, founding member and partner.

In a new post on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website today, the CDC summarizes the Hepatitis A outbreak that is connected to imported frozen strawberries used by the Tropical Smoothie Cafe. Although the contaminated strawberries were removed from the restaurant on August 8, 2016, new cases of Hepatitis A continue to be identified because symptoms can take up to 50 days to appear. To date, 119 cases have been identified and 47 people have been hospitalized, but no deaths have been reported.

Health departments of the states involved (Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, New York, North Carolina, Arkansas, Wisconsin, Oregon), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the CDC are continuing and coordinating their ongoing investigations. "Epidemiologic and traceback evidence indicate frozen strawberries imported from Egypt are the likely source of this outbreak."

Consumers who believe they have gotten sick from a smoothie from Tropical Smoothie Cafe before August 8, 2016, should contact their doctor immediately. As of now, investigations indicate that there is not an ongoing risk of Hepatitis A virus infection at Tropical Smoothie Cafes, nor is there any awareness of any other restaurants or retailers that are involved.

CDC's advice to consumers includes the following guidelines:

  • "Contact your doctor if you think you may have become ill from eating a smoothie containing strawberries from a Tropical Smoothie Cafe prior to August 8, 2016.
  • It is important that food handlers and restaurant employees contact their doctor and stay home if they are infected with hepatitis A. This helps prevent the virus from spreading.
  • Not everyone will experience symptoms from a hepatitis A infection. Some people may experience mild flu-like symptoms. Other symptoms of hepatitis A virus infection include: yellow eyes or skin, abdominal pain, pale stools, dark urine."

Do you have any questions about this post? If so, please email Mr. Zambri: szambri@reganfirm.com.

About the author:

Mr. Zambri has been successful in litigating food poisoning cases. He is knowledgeable and experienced in handling the unique complexities involved in food poisoning litigation.

Mr. Zambri is the author of a widely renowned book on product liability litigation. His experience and knowledge regarding personal injury is often sought by other lawyers and he regularly speaks at seminars regarding personal injury litigation. Mr. Zambri has also been acknowledged as one of "The Best Lawyers in America" by Best Lawyers (2016 edition) and has been repeatedly named a "Super Lawyer" by Super Lawyer magazine (2016) - national publications that honor the top lawyers in America.

Blog Home