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June Is Men's Health Month [6 Pressing Medical Issues for Men]

Posted By Regan Zambri Long, PLLC || 14-Jun-2016

Many men stay away from the doctor as long as they feel productive. Unfortunately, dangerous diseases often develop without outward signs, a reality that makes regular checkups and general awareness of leading indicators of fitness essential. In honor of the fact that June is Men’s Health Month, we’ve compiled six very important medical issues that affect men.

  1. Atherosclerosis, otherwise known as hardening of the arteries, poses a serious health threat to millions of men. When the condition involves the arteries in the heart, it can lead to a heart attack; and when it involves the arteries in the brain, it can cause stroke. Believe it or not, cardiologists still hotly debate both the fundamental causes of this condition as well as what should be done to prevent it. For decades, the dominant medical paradigm suggested that a high fat diet combined with a sedentary lifestyle put men at risk. New science – and new evaluations of old science – suggests a very different picture. This new paradigm says that a high fat diet, when composed of the right fats and devoid of sugar and refined carbohydrate, can be cardio-protective and that key indicators to assess include triglyceride to HDL level, coronary artery scans (CACs) and markers of inflammation, such as CRP.
  2. Lung cancer tends to spread to other parts of the body before it becomes big enough to produce symptoms. Since tobacco smoke instigates the majority of these malignancies, quitting smoking should at the very least reduce your risk.
  3. Prostate cancer, the second most common malignancy in men, can be either slow growing or aggressive. Screening can lead to early detection, which saves lives. For more information, see New Guidelines on Prostate Cancer Screening.
  4. Men aren’t immune to depression, a malady that sometimes results in suicides. A chilling statistic reveals suicide as the eighth leading cause of death in men. An analysis published in 2015 found a spike in suicides and drug use in middle-aged white men, which might be related to reduced job opportunities related to a contracting economy.
  5. A silent killer, diabetes may develop so gradually that it catches men unaware. Frequent urination and thirst are the signs that usually motivate men to visit a doctor. When blood sugar problems are found early, lifestyle changes may prevent them from advancing to diabetes. Many physicians are now promoting diets lower in carbohydrate to treat Type II diabetes, since these diets are clinically better at lowering insulin and blood sugar.
  6. Although erectile dysfunction doesn’t threaten life, doctors consider it an important health issue. Men with this disorder should discuss it with their practitioner.

Health issues caused by carelessness or negligence can be scary, particularly if there’s a debate over who’s responsible. Contact our D.C. injury attorneys for a free consultation about your potential case.

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