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Hurt in 2015? How to Make 2016 a Great Year Despite Your Injury or Disability

Posted By Regan Zambri Long, PLLC || 27-Jan-2016

A bad car accident, slip and fall injury or acquired disability turned 2015 upside down for you and your family. You’re likely still struggling to come to terms with your new limitations and figure out how to get your finances, career and relationships in order and to restore your sense of balance and peace of mind.

Obviously, you need to give yourself time to grieve your losses. But remember that life can still be full and rich. A study published in Disability and Rehabilitation found after people with spinal cord injuries went through an adjustment period, they enjoyed high levels of independence, social support and life satisfaction. In other words, your accident or injury should not stop you from pursuing amazing things and living life to its fullest.

Here are some guidelines in how to make 2016 a great year.

Get a Support System​

Consider connecting with other people who have your disability or limitation. Doing so might make a huge difference in your outlook and emotional health. You’ll receive comfort, encouragement and empathy from those who understand your experience. The professionals who organize these groups can also be a good troubleshooting resource.

Develop a Positive Attitude​

Decide to use the abilities you still have to the utmost, and see what you can accomplish. Examples of people with disabilities who achieved wonderful things abound in history as well as present-day life. Franklin Delano Roosevelt led the country through WWII, although he was unable to walk. Other inspiring examples include Stevie Wonder, a successful blind musician, and Marlee Matlin, a deaf actress who won an academy award.

Practice Mindfulness

This article from Alternet summarizes some of the most compelling science on this subject: “Mindfulness training can lead to measurable improvements in the ability to focus and to regulate emotions and behavior even in those who do not suffer from attentional disorders. A 2013 study published in the journal Psychological Science showed that a brief mindfulness exercise before an exam helped students identify distracting thoughts, which lead to improvements in reading comprehension and working memory… Clearly, you don’t have to be an experienced mediator to benefit from mindfulness. As little as a single, short meditation session can have a positive impact on mental functioning.”

If someone you love is in the hospital due to a person or provider’s negligence or carelessness, our D.C. medical malpractice attorneys can help. Call or email us now.

Categories: Personal Injury
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