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A Quick Primer on Dangerous Toys

Posted By Regan Zambri & Long || 1-Jan-2015

The holidays may be behind us, but it’s not too late to inspect the new toys added the toy box to determine whether the gifters actually followed general guidelines in child toy safety. Please review the list below and eliminate toys that are too dangerous.

#1. Avoid giving “choke-y” toys to kids who are three-years-old or younger.

 

Balloons, balls or bells should exceed 1.75 inches in diameter — roughly the size of the diameter of a tube of toilet paper. Small toys that have tiny batteries (so-called “button batteries”) can not only lead to choking hazards but also to swallowing hazards, as the battery acid in these button batteries can cause fatal injuries.

 

#2. Avoid giving magnetic toys to young children.

 

Magnets are fascinating to children because of the counterintuitive, almost magical way they interact. Unfortunately, if magnets are swallowed, they can damage the intestines and digestive tract and lead to infection.

 

#3. Read the labels, and toss the packaging.

 

Toy manufacturers must label age appropriateness. If you buy toys for older children, be aware that younger children may want to play with those toys… or may steal them from the older children when they’re not looking. Shop with that potential hazard in mind.

 

The plastic bags and foam peanuts that come packaged with many children’s toys can lead to choking or inhalation hazards. Toss those materials or recycle them, if possible.

 

#4. Be watchful for toys that are too loud, too heavy, or contain strings or cords.

 

Many kids’ toys are deafeningly loud. Adults find them annoying. But they can actually potentially cause hearing loss – yet another reason to avoid them. Likewise, heavy toys can fall on kids (or adults), causing broken toes or even concussions.

 

#5. Research the potential toxicity of toys at HealthyStuff.org.

 

This consumer website has tested over 5,000 products for levels of flame retardants, arsenic, lead, Bisphenol A and other potential hazards. You can also go to the Consumer Product Safety Commission website, which archives recalls of children’s toys and other products.

 

Did someone you love get hurt as a result of a defective toy or other instrument, product or device? Call the Washington D.C. defectively product lawyers with Regan, Zambri & Long for a free consultation.

 

Another great way to protect kids is to make sure their car seats are properly installed and function. Check out: DOT Reveals Powerful New Tools, Technologies and Ideas to Boost Car Seat Safety

 

Categories: Child Safety
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