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August Is National Immunization Awareness Month - Round Up of Immunization News

Posted By Regan Zambri & Long || 17-Aug-2015

2015 has been a momentous year, in terms of discussion of immunization policy. Ridiculous, unscientific efforts to connect early childhood vaccinations with autism have fortunately stalled, thanks in part to publication of another exhaustive scientific analysis that confirmed that there is no link between autism and immunization/vaccination.

Earlier in the summer, in response to a measles outbreak in Disneyland, the state of California passed a measure rescinding the "personal belief" exemption for vaccinating young children against diseases, such as rubella, mumps and measles.

On a more positive (and also newsworthy) note, scientists recently announced that they may have developed a massively effective vaccine against the terrifying virus, Ebola, which threatened to create a global viral pandemic in late 2014.

The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, along with the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, is trying to spread positive, objective and useful information about immunizations during August, National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM). This event strives to "highlight the value of immunization across the lifespan."

The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, along with the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, is trying to spread positive, objective and useful information about immunizations during August, National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM). This event strives to "highlight the value of immunization across the lifespan."

  • The first week of August will focus on preteens and teens.
  • The second week, from the 9th to 15th, will address immunization concerns related to pregnant women.
  • August 16th to 22nd will explore adult related immunization questions.
  • Finally, from the 23rd to 29th, discussion will focus on immunizations for infants and children.

You can explore these messages and dive deeper into any topics at the NPHIC website. Some of the critical messages that these institutions are trying to get out include:

  • Parents of young kids (2 and under) should explore and get immunizations for their children according to an appropriate schedule not only to protect their children but also to ensure our "herd immunity" to these dangerous viruses and diseases.
  • Parents of children ages 9 to 18 should ensure that kids have gotten all their vaccines before going back to school (or going off to college).
  • Adults - particularly those who work in healthcare industries - should get boosters or new vaccines to be fully up to speed.
  • Pregnant women might need to get immunizations for protection against problems like whooping cough.
  • Everyone should know that flu season is on the doorstep and that flu vaccinations can and do save lives every year.

If someone you love is in the hospital due to a person or provider's negligence or carelessness, our D.C. medical malpractice attorneys can help. Call or email us now.

In addition to ensuring that your kids are immunized, protect them against drowning or other water accidents in August. Learn the facts here: 6 Surprising Swimming Pool Dangers.

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