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Toxic Metal Found in Children’s Jewelry

Posted By Regan Zambri & Long || 11-Jan-2010

 Posted by: Salvatore J. Zambri, founding partner

                                                                                                                    

In a story appearing on at least 143 news websites, the AP (1/11, Pritchard) reports that recent lab tests have shown "eye-popping levels" of cadmium in children’s jewelry. The metal, which has been linked to cancer and weakened kidneys, "is particularly dangerous for children, because growing bodies readily absorb substances, and cadmium accumulates in the kidneys for decades." Recent research has also determined that children exposed to cadmium "were more likely to report learning disabilities," and that it "lowers IQ even more than lead." 

"Just small amounts of chemicals may radically alter development," said Dr. Robert O. Wright, a professor at Harvard University’s medical school and school of public health. "I can’t even fathom why anyone would allow for even a small amount to be accessible."

MSNBC, reports, "There is no definitive explanation for why children’s jewelry manufacturers, virtually all from China in the items tested, are turning to cadmium. But a reasonable double whammy looms: Cadmium prices have plummeted as factories grasp for substitutes now that lead is heavily regulated under the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008.

That law set a new, stringent standard for lead in children’s products: Only the very smallest amount is permissible — no more than 0.0003 percent of the total content. The statute has led manufacturers to drastically reduce lead in toys and jewelry.

The law also contained the first explicit regulation of cadmium, though the standards are significantly less strict than lead and apply only to painted toys, not jewelry."

According to MSNBC, some of the most dangerously toxic items are "charms sold at Walmart, at the jewelry chain Claire’s and at a dollar store. High amounts of cadmium also were detected in ‘The Princess and The Frog’ movie-themed pendants."

Try to conduct some research before purchasing toys for children.  Even low toxicity levels can cause significant, permanent developmental problems.  Of course, it is difficult, if not impossible at times, to determine how dangerous some products are, so manufacturers need to put people over profits and be sure they products are safe before they enter the marketplace.   Lives are at stake.

About the author:

Mr. Zambri is a Past-President of the Trial Lawyers Association of Metropolitan Washington, D.C. and has been rated by Washingtonian magazine as a "Big Gun" and among the "top 1%" of all lawyers in the Washington metropolitan area.  The magazine also describes him as "one of Washington’s best–most honest and effective lawyers" whose practice is dedicated to representing people in catastrophic personal injury matters, including product liability, medical malpractice and automobile accident claims.  Mr. Zambri has also been named a "Super Lawyer" by Super Lawyer magazine (March/April 2009)–a national publication that honors the top lawyers in America.  

Mr. Zambri was sought after to publish a chapter regarding product liability litigation in Aspatore Books – a company that is touted as "the largest and most exclusive publisher of C-1 Level executives (CEO, CFO, CTO, CMO, Partner) from the world’s most respected companies and law firms."  To read Mr. Zambri’s publication, entitled "Constantly Preparing To Win", please click here.

If you have any questions about your legal rights, please email Mr. Zambri at szambri@reganfirm.com or call him at 202-822-1899.  

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