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Safety Officials Urge Drivers to Inspect Tire Valve Stems Distributed by Dill Air Control.

Posted By Regan Zambri & Long || 1-Oct-2008

Dill Air Control, a subsidiary of the Chinese company, Shanghai Baolong Industries, has approximately 30 million potentially faulty tire valve stems in North American distribution. The faulty valve stems are thought to be cracking, causing a slow leak that may lead to tire failure at higher speeds – a situation that has proven to be fatal for at least one Florida resident in 2006, according to an article by Consumer Reports.

Dill Air Control’s TR-413, TR-413 chrome, TR-414, and TR-418 are the suspected faulty products. As of now, there is no way of knowing which tires use these particular valve stems. However, The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has launched an investigation into the situation and are running tests on the suspected valve stems.

According to stamfordadvocate.com the NHTSA has "ordered detailed information" about any "use of Dill valve stems and reports of failure" from the following companies:

  • Sears
  • Myers Tire Supply
  • Tire Kingdom
  • Discount Tires
  • Mohawk

Discount Tires has sent out letters to their customers warning them of the possible dangers of these potentially faulty valve stems. Dill Air Control has also posted a letter on their website warning consumers of the danger of these valves. Furthermore, Tech International recalled 6 million of the valve systems that were manufactured by the same Chinese Co. that makes Dill Air Control’s valve stems.

It is impossible to be sure of the safety of the valve stems on your car without removing the tire from the wheel which is why safety officials are urging motorists to have their car’s valves inspected by an automotive professional.

According to Sean Kane, President of Safety Research and Strategies in Rehoboth, Massachusetts. it is especially important to get your valve stems inspected if you had a tire replaced during or after July 2006. At the very least, it is suggested that motorists inspect their own vehicles by removing the hub cap and checking at the base of the valve stem to see if it is in good condition. More detailed instructions on how to check your valve stems   and how to file a claim are posted on the Dill Air Control website.

Furthermore Dill Air Control encourages customers who have suspicious valve stems to send them into the company for a full refund.

You can file a claim in any of the following ways:

Previously on the DC Metro Area Personal Injury Law Blog, we have posted articles related to:

For information about your legal rights, please click here or call the law firm of Regan Zambri & Long, PLLC at 202-759-6699.

 

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