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Road Rules: Safety Tips for Motorists, Parents and Children on Halloween

Posted By Regan Zambri & Long || 31-Oct-2008

Halloween can be a very dangerous night for children who frequently become young, and not always very street-smart, pedestrians as they trick-or-treat.  AAA provides the following tips for motorists, parents, and children when making Halloween plans. Crashes involving fatalities, drinking or children increase on Halloween.  Following these AAA precautions could help prevent such incidents.

FOR MOTORISTS:

  • Slow down in residential neighborhoods and obey all traffic signs and signals.  Drive at least 5 mph below the posted speed limit to give yourself extra time to react to children who may dart into the street.
  • Watch for children walking on roadways, medians and curbs.  In dark costumes, they’ll be harder to see at night.
  • Look for children crossing the street.  They may not be paying attention to traffic and cross the street at mid-block or between parked cars.
  • Carefully enter and exit driveways and alleys.

FOR PARENTS:

  • Ensure an adult or older, responsible youth is available to supervise children under the age of 12.
  • Review trick-or-treating safety precautions, including pedestrian and traffic safety rules.
  • Plan and discuss the route your trick-or-treaters will follow.

FOR CHILDREN:

  • Carry a flashlight containing fresh batteries, and place it face-down in the the treat bucket to free up one hand. never shine it into the eyes of oncoming drivers.
  • Stay on sidewalks and avoid walking in streets if possible.
  • If there are no sidewalks, walk on the left side of the road, facing traffic.
  • Look both ways and listen for traffic before crossing the street.
  • Cross streets only at the corner, and never cross between parked vehicles or mid-block.
  • Trick-or-treat in a group if someone older cannot go with you.
  • Tell your parents where you are going.

Halloween is meant to be a night of fun for both adults and children.  These AAA guidelines aim to keep it that way.

 

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